was successfully added to your cart.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac and how it can help you:

 

In preparation for the winter season, it’s important to do some research about what the upcoming weather predictions will be. The Old Farmer’s Almanac; more specifically the long range forecast is the perfect source! The forecast accuracy is about 80 % due to the gathering and study of overall weather patterns. 

The long range forecast can predict weather patterns and temperatures for up to two months, so it’s a perfect source to consider when thinking about changing your tires. 

The Farmer’s Almanac bases its forecasts on three scientific disciplines:

  • solar science (the study of sunspots and other solar activity)
  • climatology (the study of prevailing weather patterns)
  • meteorology (the study of the atmosphere)

In making accurate predictions, the information is gathered amongst different regions throughout the United States and Canadian Provinces.

Canadian winters really portray the perfect ‘white Christmas’, however, if you live in Ontario you may experience a harsher winter than the other provinces with temperatures and snowfall expected to be greater than normal.

 

Atlantic Canada

  • Includes: New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and part of Québec.
  • Winter temperatures will be normal with the coldest period beginning mid-December to early March. Precipitation will be below normal in the north but above normal in the south. The snowfall will be above average beginning mid November to early February.  

Southern Quebec

  • Winter temperatures will be normal with the coldest periods in early December to late February. The snowfall will be generally below normal but the snowiest period will be from late November to late March.

Southern Ontario

  • Winter temperatures, precipitation and snowfall will be above average. The coldest period will be from mid-November to early March while the snowiest period will be from early December to early March.

The Prairies 

  • Includes: Southern Alberta, Southern Manitoba and Southern Saskatchewan.
  • Temperatures will be higher than normal with above normal precipitation. It will be the coldest beginning in early January through early March. The snowfall will be below average in the west but above average everywhere else with the snow beginning mid-November to early April

Southern British Columbia

  • Winter will be colder with above normal precipitation and below normal snowfall. The coldest and snowiest period being from mid-December to mid-February. 

Northwest Territories and Yukon 

  • Winter temperatures, precipitation and snowfall will be above normal.
  • For the Northwest Territories, the coldest period will be from early January to mid-February while the snowiest period will be from mid-November to late December.
  • While in Yukon the coldest period will be from late November to early March and the snowiest period from mid-November until early February.
The winter season throughout the United States varies depending on what region you live in. Those who live further north, specifically in the snowbelt, will experience different ranges of temperatures and snowfall this year.
Keep reading to learn more about your location.

 

 

1.Northeast Region 

  • Includes (parts of): Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York and Vermont.
  • The winter will be milder than normal with above normal precipitation and normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be throughout January and the snowiest periods will be from mid-November to early January

2. Atlantic Corridor 

  • Includes (parts of): Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Massachusetts, NY, NJ, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia. 
  • The winter temperatures will be above average with the coldest period being between mid-January to late February. Precipitation will be above normal while the snowfall will be a little below average. The snowiest period will be throughout February.  

6. Lower lakes region 

  • Includes (parts of): Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, NY, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. 
  • Winter will be normal with above average precipitation. The coldest periods will be from early December to mid-January. The snowfall will be above normal, specifically in Ohio, and the snowiest period will be from early January to late March. 

9. Upper Midwest

  • Includes (parts of): Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota.
  • The winter temperatures will be above normal with the coldest and snowiest periods taking place from early January to late March.

 

If you live in any of these regions and are expecting snow beginning early November, consider changing your tires with the Jack and Jill of All Tires to be prepared for this upcoming winter!

 

For further information about daily, monthly and yearly weather predictions in your region, you can head over to the Almanac website and discover more about general weather and temperature patterns.